Monthly Archives: May, 2013

Scripture Commentary for the Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ (June 2, 2013)

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1st Reading – Genesis 14: 18 – 20

Melchizedek is mentioned in only three places in scripture: this reading plus Psalm 110:4 and Hebrews 5:6, 10; 6:20-7:22.  He is said to be the king of Salem; its name means peace. This place becomes the city of Jerusalem, the center of Israel’s kingdom.

It was customary for a king to be hospitable toward a victorious leader, but there are no ulterior motives here.  Instead, there is a beautiful blessing ritual, to which Abram gives thanks.  Note that Abram did not take his victory greedily.  He only wanted to save his nephew Lot and retrieve the possessions that were taken from him.   For the victory and the blessing, he gives thanks to God.   How do you give thanks to god for the victories and blessings in your life?  

 Later Christian writers would evoke this episode in history and consider it a prefigurement of Christ.  Jesus would offer the blessing of his life – the effect would be irrevocable and would be the gift of God’s self to the entire world – redemption.  Jesus is the only true priest because of both his humanity and his divinity (Birmingham, W&W, p. 560-561).

 

2nd Reading – 1 Corinthians 11: 23-26

This is the earliest written account (maybe 53-55 AD) of Jesus’ Last Supper and the words that have become our Eucharistic prayer.

From Celebration, June 1998:

Eucharist is about a remembering (anamnesis) that does not simply call to mind the past events of Jesus’ life, death, and resurrection.  The Eucharist makes present here and now, within the gathered assembly of believers, the reality of Jesus’ saving death and resurrection. Each Eucharist is a “living remembrance of Jesus’ act of love.” By our participation (offering our ‘hungry selves’, hearkening to God’s Word, sharing peace, and then eating and drinking) in the Eucharist, believers proclaim and are integrated into that death and are given a taste of the resurrected life to come.

We “proclaim the death of the Lord” . . .  What does this mean?  In Eucharist Christ comes to us as the one in whom God participates in the emptiness and negativity of life, as the one in whom God accepts us in the most unrestricted way possible, and as the one who in virtue of this acceptance, lays claim to all that we are and can be. The Eucharist is not simply a celebration of the resurrection of Jesus or the fact that he now lives. Rather, it is a celebration of the fact that it is the crucified one who now lives; it is a celebration of the God who came into the brokenness, the ‘unwholeness’ and the unholiness’ of the human situation, and who came to stay. In Jesus, God has come to be with us where we are. To proclaim the death of the Lord is to find in his death a new definition of ourselves – a new understanding of the meaning of success and failure, of the meaning of life and death, of what it means to be a human person. (John Dwyer, The Sacraments, “Chapter Eight: the Eucharist” p.129-130)

 

The Gospel – Luke 9: 11-17

It is important to place this gospel story within the context of the overall gospel of Luke.  Chapter 9 had started with Jesus commissioning the Twelve and sending them out to proclaim the Kingdom of God.  After they go out Luke tells us of Herod’s curiosity about Jesus:  “I beheaded John. Who then is this about whom I hear such things?”  Then the Twelve return.  They withdraw in private to Bethsaida, but the crowds follow Jesus, and yet, he welcomed them . . . here then, is where the gospel story begins.  It ends with a superabundance of satisfying food.

From “Working with the Word,” http://liturgy.slu.edu:

Too often we narrowly view Eucharist in the context of the Last Supper and its elements of bread and wine. This gospel expands our perception to include the whole event of hungering, and then gathering, blessing, breaking, giving, eating, and being satisfied. Evil diminishes life and enslaves people; God’s kingdom restores life and liberates them from hunger – ‘malnutrition’ and oppression. This story illustrates Jesus’ Beatitudes: Blessed are the poor, the kingdom is yours . . . and the hungry will be satisfied.

It is at Eucharist that we experience most intimately the communion of saints.  Communion of saints in Greek is koinōnia hagiōn.  Koinōnia is any partnership, fellowship, activity, experience or relationship where people come together.  It is togetherness for mutual benefit and goodness (Barclay, The Apostles Creed p. 245).  Hagiōn literally means sacred things, hagiōi meaning members of the Church as saints, or sacred people (p. 247).  Imagine the sacred things as being that which we share in Eucharist, the body and blood of Jesus.  In that sense, we are sharing sacred things as a communion (koinōnia) of sacred people.  In the Byzantine liturgy, the priest says, “Holy things for holy people” at the distribution of Holy Communion (Shannon, Catholic Update  May 2005, p.4).  We become the body of Christ.

In the book With God in Russsia by Walter Ciszek  (an autobiography of a Jesuit priest), he recounts being in Poland in a concentration camp and celebrating Mass.  It was forbidden to do so, so it had to be done in secret.  Fasting before Eucharist from the midnight before was common practice then.  Since the inmates were only given 2 meals of gruel a day, giving up the morning meal was a true sacrifice.  If guards did not make it possible to celebrate at the scheduled time, they may go even longer without eating.  So this priest and those he celebrated Mass with truly held Eucharist in deep, deep faith  (Nolan, Hungry, and You Fed Me, p. 273-275).  Consider this as you receive Eucharist this week.

   

Let us pray: 

Christ, be vital food; bread for our souls.

You were broken because we are broken.

You bless us beyond all telling.

Your grace expands like loaves and fishes.

You lavish love on us each time you come to us

and make us one,

since you are our very food and drink.

Help us to pour this love out to one another.  Amen.

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Homily by the Pope

Homily by the Pope

Read this or listen to the podcast at the end.  He ends with:  .”So we ask the Lord that all those who come to the Church find the doors open, find the doors open, open to meet this love of Jesus. We ask this grace.”  Let the church say AMEN!

Trust, Believe, Pray, Love: The Holy Spirit

Father’s Bob’s Homily on Pentecost…

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Pentecost 2013

 

Trust in the Holy Spirit.  Trust in the Holy Spirit, God’s sweet gift of eternity given so generously now.  Trust in the Spirit from whom all wisdom flows.  Trust in the Holy Spirit, the only pathway to truth.  Trust in the Spirit that brings us peace.  Trust in the Spirit that teaches us to love and to be loved.  Trust in the Holy Spirit that gives us courage in the midst of our fear and healing in the midst of our pain.  Trust in the Holy Spirit that comforts the distressed and supports the weary and the broken hearted.  Trust in the Holy Spirit who speaks the truth and stands up for us when we are persecuted.  Trust in the Holy Spirit of Jesus Christ who loves all, blesses all and redeems all.  Trust in the Holy Spirit who shows us the face of God, who will…

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Scripture Commentary for The Most Holy Trinity

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Let us pray this Reflection by Hildegard of Bingen

Good people,

Most royal greening verdancy,

                Rooted in the sun,

        you shine with radiant light.

In this circle of earthly existence

        you shine so finely, it surpasses understanding.

God hugs you.

        You are encircled by the arms

                of the mystery of God.  Amen. 

On Trinity Sunday we celebrate the very essence of God – and how we experience this essence. And so, by this celebration we hope to come to experience this mystery more deeply within our real and everyday lives. This God of love, truth and life is not a puzzle to be solved, but a mystery to be loved, experienced,  and lived.

From Elizabeth Johnson’s Quest for the Living God, “Trinity: The Living God of Love”:

Christians do not believe in three gods but in one. What is particular to this faith is the belief that this one God has graciously reached out to the world in love in the person of Jesus Christ in order to heal, redeem, and liberate . . .

It lifts up God’s gracious ways active in the world through Jesus Christ and the Spirit, and finds there the fundamental revelation about God’s own being as self-giving communion of love . . .  This is about “an encounter with divine Mystery” . . . experiencing the saving God in a threefold way as beyond them, and with them, and within them . . .

‘Trinity theology’ too often has presented its findings as if they were a literal description of a self-contained Trinity of three divine persons knowing and loving each other. This, of course, is not the case, no such literal description is possible . . .  we must think with humility. Our “God is not two men and a bird” even though artists have often depicted the Trinity this way. This art is a meditation not a photograph. (207-208)

God is love – God lives as this mystery of love. We humans are created in this image. “Knowing God is impossible unless we enter into a life of love and communion with others.” “The church’s identity and mission pivot on this point . . .  Only a community of equal persons related in profound mutuality, pouring out praise of God and care for the world in need, only such a church corresponds to the triune God it purports to serve.”  (223)

“The point is, with the three circling around in a mutual, dynamic movement of love, God is not a static being but a plenitude of self-giving love, a saving mystery that overflows into the world of sin and death to heal, redeem, and liberate.  The whole point of this history of god with the world is to bring the world back into the life of God’s own communion, back into the divine dance of life  (p. 214).

1st Reading – Proverbs 8: 22 – 31

The Book of Proverbs is sort of an ‘Owners manual for the Jewish mind, heart and hands. All the chapters tell the reader about a spirit of right living: a life of discipline, restraint, just judgment, and relational sensitivity. This passage is a poetic presentation of how Wisdom assisted in creation. The goodness of creation and of ourselves is affirmed so that we reverence and use well all of that creation.  Larry Gillick, S.J., http://onlineministries.creighton.edu/CollaborativeMinistr/053010.html

This passage in the Old Testament is considered typology…a foreshadow or hint of what may be understood further in the New Testament.  Trinity is not a concept that was revealed well in OT, but this is a prefigurement:  the idea that the Father had company in creation.

2nd Reading – Romans 5: 1-5

Paul insists that standing firm in the midst of trials yields to endurance and a firm hope.  For Paul, the assurance that salvation was a free gift for all inclusively was based on his belief in God’s love shown to us through the power of the Holy Spirit.  It was Paul’s firm belief in the triune nature of God that would later be the foundation upon which theologians based the doctrine of Trinity.  For Paul it was the Christian anchor:  hope and endurance come through faith in the Triune God’s transcendent power!  (Birmingham, Word & Worship, p. 554)  How has hope and endurance helped you in the midst of trial?

The Gospel – John 16: 12-15

This passage continues the Farewell Discourse of the Last Supper that Jesus has with his disciples.  Note how gentle Jesus is in not wanting to overwhelm them by only feeding them bits of information that they are able to understand  (Think of how we teach our children!).  “Spirit” in this piece of scripture in Greek is “paraclete”…one who stands by us.  We have a God that stands forever with us.  How does this speak to you?

Let us pray this prayer by Richard Rohr…

God for Us, we call You Father,

God Alongside Us, we call You Jesus,

God Within Us, we call You Holy Spirit.

You are the Eternal Mystery

That enables, enfolds, and enlivens all things,

Even us, and even me.

Every name falls short of your

Goodness and Greatness.

We can only see who You are in what is.

We ask for such perfect seeing.

As it was in the beginning, is now,

and ever shall be.

Amen.

Missing Larry from Googling God

Missing Larry from Googling God

This is re-posted from a blog written by Mike Hayes, an author, commentator, Campus Minister and Spiritual Director. He founded the award winning BustedHalo.com in 2001 and wrote the book Googling God with Paulist Press in 2007.  Read on if you are a dog lover or a fan of finding God on a walk!

St. Francis and the (Im)possible Gift of Love

Consider this!

Dating God

the-practice-of-generosity giftOne of the problems with the idea of a gift is that it typically sets in motion an economy of exchange that, unintended by the giver and receiver, can set up a sense of inequality and debit that is not easily overcome. We’ve all been in this social situation before: someone at work gives you a holiday present, unexpectedly, with the sincerest desire to be kind and nice. Yet, you feel indebted, even embarrassed perhaps, for not having something ready at hand to give in return. This exchange sets up an imbalance that denies the possibility of a true gift, for a true gift is freely given and received without there being established such pressure for reciprocation, without there arising a sense of self-gratification or embarrassment, without the possibility of something ever given in return.

The French philosopher Jacques Derrida was, along with many other topics, deeply concerned about the 

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I Didn’t Stop by: Kristine Rooney

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My family and I went to Boston over spring break, well before all of the recent trauma in the news.  We did the Freedom Trail on a very windy and chilly day.  The kids were complaining some, and so was I.  The wind felt like it was going right through us at times.  We turned a corner, and there was a homeless man sitting on the sidewalk.  He was sitting on the sidewalk wearing black trash bags to keep out the cold.  He wasn’t even asking for money.  He was just sitting in an alcove, doing the best he could to keep warm.   My thoughts raced for a minute.  What do you do when you see a homeless person?  Give money?  What will he do with the money?  Is he dangerous?  Is it safe for us to approach him?  My lack of indecision made me want to hurry on.  I didn’t stop.  We kept going.  My son Thomas said, “Was he a homeless man?”   I said, “Yes, Thomas.  Let’s keep going.  It’s so cold.”

I didn’t stop.  It was not until we were on our way home that my husband and I really questioned our decision.  If nothing else, we could have gotten him a cup of coffee.  We could have warmed him up in some, small way… instead of worrying about our own warmth.  We could have made a difference with our children in showing compassion.  I regret that we did not react quickly enough, but this stranger did teach us what to do next time.  We prayed for forgiveness, and we prayed for him.

I recently read this in Edward Foley’s book, From Age to Age:  How Christians Have Celebrated the Eucharist:  The Gospel of Luke presents the resurrected Jesus as a stranger to his own disciples on the road to Emmaus.  One of the great surprises of that story is that if the disciples had not invited the unrecognized Jesus to walk with them and to dine with them, there would have been no recognition in the breaking of the bread; no Eucharist without the stranger.

We never know when we might encounter Jesus in a stranger.  I didn’t stop.  But next time I will.

Thoughts on the Gospel Reading for 7th Sunday of Easter

Gospel:  John 17: 20 – 26

This reading is Jesus’ prayer at his last meal with his disciples.  For whom does Jesus pray, for what does Jesus pray, and why does Jesus pray for it?  Jesus prays for those who would believe in him on the word of the disciples.  He is praying that they may all be united with the same intimacy that Jesus knows with his Father.  The reason for the prayer is to bring people to faith, so people will believe that the Father sent Jesus to the world.  The unity that Christ desired for his disciples would be a result of the living presence of Christ through the Holy Spirit!  This is something that John’s community in particular needed to hear  (W&W, Birmingham, p. 312).  As you reflect on Jesus’ prayer for you, what is most comforting to you, and what might you need to change in order to conform your life more closely to what Jesus wants for you?

It is easy to see the Trinity in Jesus’ prayer.  We are being called to be one with God just as Father, Son and Spirit are one with each other.  This oneness unites us with each other too.  Jesus, as the incarnation…the Word made flesh…is the way.  The cross is a symbol of our oneness…vertical connection with God and horizontal connection with each other.  Michael Downey has more thoughts on this in Altogether Gift

 

The incomprehensibility of God lies in the utter gratuity of life and love, in God’s constant coming as gift.  God is inexhaustible Gift, Given and Gift/ing in and through love.  This is who God is and how God is.  Whatever may be known of this ineffable mystery, unfathomable because of the depth and prodigality of this life pouring itself forth in love, is known in and through the gift of the indwelling Spirit of God enabling us to recognize the Word made flesh whose life, passion, and Resurrection are the very disclosure of God’s mystery. 

 

A Trinitarian spirituality is a whole way of life by which we participate in the mission of Word and Spirit in human life, history, the church and the world, becoming ourselves expressions and configurations of God’s speaking and breathing – now.

 

The relationality of the three bonded in the one Love spills over into a relationality with the world, thereby making it possible for human persons to enter into this communion in the one Love.

 

Human personhood is not something achieved in autonomy or independence or self-determination or self-sufficiency.  Rather, human personhood is received in self-donation, being toward, always toward the other and others in relation.