Scripture Commentary on 28th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Cycle C

lepers1st Reading —  2 Kings 5: 14-17

Naaman the Syrian is cured of leprosy.  Although Syria and Israel were enjoying an unstable peace at the time, Syrians were still excluded from the Israelite community.  When Naaman says there is no God in all the earth except in Israel, he is referring to the covenant relationship God had with Israel.  The books of Kings further maintain that Yahweh is a jealous God and there are to be no other.  Yahweh alone is one, and the place of worship is also one and central  (in Jerusalem).  BUT, after Naaman’s conversion, he takes some earth from Israel with him to his home in Syria so he could build an altar (Birmingham, W&W, p. 497-498)  What does this say to you?  How will this healing compare to the healing in the Gospel?

2nd Reading —  2 Timothy 2: 8 –13

This letter in the name of Paul assures us that though he was ‘chained’ and eventually killed, “the Word of God is not chained” and that the God we find in Jesus Christ will be forever faithful – even when we are not.  God continues to work and inspire even our stage of reading and interpreting – helping these words live for us – enfleshing His love and presence in us.

“The Bible is not a book to be read,

but a drama in which to participate.” Abraham Heschel

How can the word of God free you?  William Barclay says, “Jesus must always be our own personal discovery.  Our religion can never be a carried tale.  Christianity does not mean reciting a creed; it means knowing a person,” (The Gospel of Luke, p. 121).

Margaret Silf says, “God’s life and grace will flow so much more fully and freely through empty hands, “(Inner Compass, p. 110).  How do we DO that?  Perhaps the leper teaches us…

The Gospel – Luke 17: 11-19

The leper was healed while ‘Jesus continued his journey to Jerusalem.” This is what happens to us when we walk with Jesus even to and through the difficult times and places of our lives.  We are healed each time we come to Eucharist praising God and becoming more perfectly a part of Christ’s body. We are healed each time we put others ahead of ourselves. We are healed each time we choose to forgive those who wrong us even as we try to overcome the evil.  We are healed each time we pause a few seconds to ‘give thanks to God’ for the many blessings of each day. Such gratitude makes our faith a vibrant and growing reality: we owe all to God who gives us everything that is good.  Faithfulness and thankfulness go (grow?) together (Living Liturgy, Cycle C, p.224-227).

The ten lepers asked Jesus to have pity on them.  Pity, or mercy, in the Mediterranean world, means to motivate someone to meet his or her interpersonal obligation.  In effect, the ten people in Luke are asking Jesus to give them what he owes them!

Jesus as healer was constantly challenging existing boundaries and pushing them ever outward.  Sinners, the blind, the lame and lepers were welcome within the boundaries of the holy community Jesus was forming.  Now that the lepers were healed, they are restored to their communities. The nine that left may have gone to the priests to thank God there.  The Samaritan leper could not enter Jerusalem, so he couldn’t do that.  He recognized Jesus as being one with God, and so he thanked him personally.  The other nine lepers may actually bump into Jesus again…do you think they might thank him later?  The Samaritan grabbed his opportunity while he had it, (Pilch, The Cultural World of Jesus, Cycle C, p. 150).  What opportunities do you have to thank God?

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