It Feels Like Christmas Time…but I think I’d prefer experiencing Advent! BY: Marian Brinker

Advent crazy

The snow hit last night, so 8:30 AM Mass was a difficult service to make.  I’m glad I did wake one hour after Adam had cleared the driveway and walkways of snow.  We just made it to Mass to join about 20 other brave drivers… and Al was the sole altar server for Mass. It was the only period of time today where I felt successful as a parent and relaxed enough to enjoy some time for reflection… until now?

Before the snow hit hard, we all enjoyed Jade’s school production of Willy Wonka.   The kids went to bed late; yet still, perhaps, “all snug in their beds with visions of sugar plums dancing in their heads.”  After church, I ran late running Jade to her matinee performance in the school musical. I lost my patience with attempting to write my annual Christmas letter (due to Alejandro’s constant demands to download more Apps and videos).  He got shipped to work with Dad at the rink, and I could escape my guilt of using “screens” as a babysitter again. My nightly visions “dancing in my head”  are predominantly only of “what I needed to do!” and “ways I was falling short!” Every year it seems those lists grow exponentially.   I hope it is just nostalgia that makes me think it was so much easier to put on Christmas when the kids were tots.

Like many others, financial stresses seem to grow these days rather than subside despite the fact that I went back to work once the kids started school.  Will I stop questioning my decision to NOT teach but work as an hourly-paid aide so I can be present for my kids after school rather than grading English class compositions? (I’ve always justified this decision as a balance between still wanting to work with kids and Adam’s around-the-clock demands of managing the athletic facilities at Union College, sitting on the Youth Hockey Board, coaching youth and women’s club hockey, working as a referee, staying tuned to ESPN updates, and all the phone calls, texts, emails… With the stress of budgeting bills instead of just paying them off each month, nostalgia for the heedless bliss of two incomes and no kids has regretfully also come into existence.

Then there’s that nagging trait of thinking it’s not good enough, so I just have to strive harder toward perfection.  I get home–sometimes bruised or bitten–from working with kindergarteners with social/emotional needs, nearly always emotionally drained.  I pride myself in gaining more empathy (rather than disdain or blaming them) for their life situations and reactions to them.   Yet, when I arrive home, I’m physically exhausted.  Why can’t I find it thrilling to attempt explaining multiplying and dividing mixed numbers with my son?  Why is driving across town to take Jade to hockey and walking the dog outside the rink during her practice not filling me with serenity?  Why can’t I take pride in buying the precooked meal deal and timing my arrival home with a rare break in Adam’s work schedule so we can all sit together? Since returning to work, I find myself having to predominantly act reactively to what is thrown at me rather than having the time to be proactive. (I took pride in being proactive when I was teaching).  I wasn’t the hockey goalie growing up—reactive is not my forté!  I was going to live like Thoreau; write a Great American novel or one good poem.

I understand that even in the days of Leave it to Beaver or even The Brady Bunch, working class people couldn’t relate to how rewarding domestic life was supposed to be.  Still, there’s this side of me that wants desperately to live like June Cleaver.  I know life back then wasn’t so rosy for even the upwardly mobile middle-class; that is, it was closer to Betty Draper from Mad Men… and I am certainly glad to live without all the sexism, infidelity, and alcohol abuse portrayed in that setting. (I think I’d like the clothes though!). But I guess being upset that life isn’t what it’s supposed to be is the whole problem.

Hence, why I wish it was more Advent than Christmas time.  Advent is a more reflective time.  It’s not getting caught up in “Christmas”, but taking time to reflect on what Christmas should mean… in the abstract not material sense.  So the kids are going to be disappointed that they don’t get all the THINGS they want.  I’m upset that my house isn’t sparkling clean and orderly as well as decorated to the nines… looking like a gingerbread creation. We can’t get a new car—yet—and we won’t pay the bills off until the tax refund.  (Yeah, that instead of the Disney vacation or new furniture.)  Adam being upset that the Cardinals didn’t win the World Series is just as trivial as the rest of my supposedly grave concerns.

This is as good as it gets, and maybe that’s pretty good!  Being a perfect parent isn’t being perfect.  I can’t explain fractions no matter how I try.  I couldn’t make better lasagna than Stouffers anyway.  We still have a home.  I got to see most of my family this year, and we all will see Adam’s side over Christmas. What more could one want for Christmas?  Even if my kids don’t get many new clothes or electronics, they are healthy and growing into better people every day.  I make a difference in my job… even if it’s not getting kindergarteners to pass a common core test; but rather, they feel better about themselves by learning to deal with disappointment, self-regulate their behavior issues, and become more disciplined students. Adam’s hard work heats the house and puts food on the table.  Really, isn’t life about wanting what you have instead of getting what you want?  I think if we all just take time to reflect on what makes us truly happy, we won’t get caught up in achieving Christmas before we’ve honestly taken time for Advent.

The meaning of Advent comes from the Latin words, advenire (to come to) & adventus (an arrival), and refers to Christ’s coming into this world. My prayer is for all of us to come to an understanding of what “Christ in the world” means.  It means allowing Christ to arrive into our hearts and find the gratitude in what we have.  For me, I think making it to Mass this morning helped me reconnect with that concept, especially in seeing the Advent wreath.   The first purple candle means: hope. The second purple candle means: faith. The third pink candle means: joy. The fourth and final purple candle means: peace.  I hope 2014 finds us striving for hope, faith, joy and peace, no matter what our circumstances or expectations.  A Blessed Advent to all!

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One response

  1. Thank you Marian,,,, I felt calmer after just reading this. Love the idea that each candle of the wreath has its own special gift. I have had one of the best advents of my life…. daily masses when I can, quiet morning time with a prayer/gratitude journal, singing more. No young ones to get off to school, though I’ve loved sharing tales with Kateri school children. I feel the coming LIGHT in all His forms. Your words add to my peace.

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