6th Sunday of Easter, cycle A

laying hands

1st Reading: Acts 8: 5-8, 14-17

Just before this passage Luke tells us in Acts, that Stephen was stoned and that a severe persecution broke out upon the church in Jerusalem. Persecution did to the church what wind does to seed; it scattered it, and it did produce a greater harvest. As this church was scattered like a farmer’s seed, it carried with it the goodness of God’s Word and Love to be sown in every welcoming heart. Here we see Philip, a devout Jewish Christian, offering the Samaritans (previously seen as deviant, tainted, unclean enemies) this Good News of God’s love and truth. His words of love were matched by works of love, and so healing and joy abounded. Evil was overcome, and abundant life was begun. (Celebration, May 1999)

When true faith and authentic Christianity is lived, joy is generated. Luke is  stressing that this out-reach was also authentically a part of the Jerusalem church. This calling of Peter and John to come to Samaria just confirms the right and goodness of this missionary movement. It is not correct to see this as an early separation of baptism and confirmation. Such a separation was not known in the early church. In fact, Luke even has the Holy Spirit come upon believers before baptism as in the case of Cornelius and his household (10:44-48). Also, in Acts 2:38 Luke clearly states that the Spirit is received by those who are baptized.  (Celebration, May, 2002, & Reginald Fuller, “Scripture in Depth,” http://liturgy.slu.edu )

2nd Reading: 1 Peter 3: 15-18

It wasn’t and isn’t easy to be Christian; not only do we have to overcome our own prejudices and blind-spots (with the help of Spirit) – but we can be threatened at times by persecution, or at least by misunderstanding and criticism. The community for which this letter was written was being increasingly threatened. On the local level they were despised as evildoers and challengers to sacredly-held codes and values (2:12). Believers were defamed (3:16) vilified (4:4), and insulted (4:14). Christians were seen as lacking in patriotism; when they refused to participate in the feasts of Roman gods and the cult of the emperor, they were seen as traitors. Yet, they were to give back good for any evil; they were to live Jesus’ law of love – ‘in season and out of season’. Their words of love needed to be lived even in the midst of hatred and confusion. The newly baptized are being warned that they have not been promised a ‘rose garden’. Like Jesus, when crosses come, they must pick them up with love and carry on. So must we.  (Celebration, May, 2002, & Reginald Fuller, “Scripture in Depth,” http://liturgy.slu.edu )

Hans Kung, a great theologian and scholar, who has been both applauded by many and silenced by his own church, despite his struggles gives testimony to the Spirit of Jesus that is alive in him. He says: “Why do I remain committed? I know what I can hold on to because I believe in the Spirit of Jesus Christ, who is alive today, who is the Spirit of God himself, who is the Holy Spirit. This living Spirit enables me and countless others to be truly human; not only to live but also to die – because in everything, both positive and negative, in all happiness and unhappiness, we are sustained by God.” To have this awareness – to believe this Good News – is to have salvation: fullness of life. (Celebration, May, 2002)

The Gospel: John 14: 15-21

Recall Deacon Ron’s homily last Sunday.  Spirit is our spiritual GPS.  We must only believe and trust in Spirit to show us the way, or re-calculate when we stray!

From Living Liturgy, 2004, p. 128:

When does God dwell among us? The gospel says it is when we love, keep Jesus’ word, and believe. Rather than three different tasks, these are really three descriptions of the same action – giving of one’s self – a self-sacrifice that leads to life. And, what does God bring when God dwells among us? God brings us his Holy Spirit, the Advocate, to enlighten us, to empower us, to put our troubled, fearful hearts at work and at peace.

It may seem sort of a quid pro quo statement of Jesus’ to warn us that if we love him we must keep his commandments. But what Jesus in John’s gospel seems to be actually trying to emphasize is that love is more than words. It is either a living reality or it is false. What are the works of love which Jesus’ disciples are to obey and enact? How are the words of love to be realized in works of love? If you scan the gospel, you find these examples and more: to lead through service, to ‘wash another’s feet’, to feed the hungry, to welcome the stranger and the sinner, to call God our loving Abba, Papa, and to see all others as brothers and sisters of this loving Father. Only by the power and grace of his Spirit can this done. Those who welcome this Spirit live in love and obedience; those who live in love and obedience are persons in whom the Spirit dwells. (It’s sort of a chicken-and-egg thing!)  (Celebration, May, 1999)

From John Pilch, “Historical Cultural Context,” http://liturgy.slu.edu:

The word, “Advocate,” is sometimes translated “paraclete,” “counselor” or “comforter” – the Greek word basically means “advocate,” a legal term that is for the “one who stands by the side of a defendant.” From its use in the gospel it seems that it has three functions or activities.

1)    It is the continued presence of Jesus on earth after his life/death/resurrection

/ascension experience.

2) It is a truth-telling Spirit (14:17; 16:13) assuring us that Jesus is not a shameful failure, but the beloved of God.

3) It reminds them of things that Jesus said (14:26) and reveals things Jesus was unable to convey (16: 12-14).

In other words, this Advocate represents divine presence and guidance. It is all we need!

Some thoughts from Pope Francis’ Evangelii Gaudium:

“Let us not flee fromt eh resurrection of Jesus, let us never give up, com what will.  May nothing inspire more than his life, which impels us onwards!” (p. 3)

“Joy adapts and changes, but it always endures, even as a flicker of light born of our personal certainty that, when everything is said and done, we are infinitely loved.” (p. 4)

“Being a Christian is not the result of an ethical choice or a lofty idea, but the encounter with an event, a person, which gives life a new horizon and a decisive direction.”  (p. 4 quoting, Pope Benedict XVI)

“An evangelizing community gets involved by word and deed in people’s lives; it bridges distances, it is willing to abase itself if necessary, and it embraces human life, touching the suffering flesh of Christ in others.  Evangelizers thus take on the “smell of the sheep” and the sheep are willing to hear their voice.”  (p. 8)

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One response

  1. What a beautiful reflection it is? Thanks

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