The Exaltation of the Holy Cross, cycle A

cross

The cross is a symbol of our salvation.  Each time we look upon and venerate the cross; each time we cross ourselves in the name of the Father, Son and Spirit, we profess our willingness to take Jesus seriously, to live the radical Gospel fully, and to die for our beliefs, our values and commitment to God, to Jesus and one another (Sanchez, PD, NCR for 8/29-9/11).

1st Reading – Numbers 21:4b-9

What logic is behind this reading and command? Why should a victim have to look at that which can kill them? The reason becomes a bit clearer if we look at the meaning of the snakebites which is the same thing as looking at the nature of sin, since the people had revolted against God and Moses. They were not even grateful any longer for the free bread that came to them from heaven. God sent the snakebites to punish them – not vindictively but as a ‘reality-check’ –considering how their sin and ingratitude had distanced them from God, the source of life – discovering later in their pain that they were suffering, lonely and God-forsaken. The only answer is to open the door again, and so they do that. They own up to their sin and ask for God’s help once again. Moses is told to make a serpent out of bronze, and so he does. This serpent has no sting; they can look on it without fear and without death. They can face their wrong-doing knowing that it has been taken up into the splendor of God’s on-going love which has brought them out of slavery to new life – a love that will continue to lead them if they but follow. (Fr. John Foley, S.J., “Spirituality of the Readings, http://liturgy.slu.edu.)

2nd Reading – Philippians 2: 6-11

This early Christian hymn that Paul is using should help us to appreciate how freely God gives his love to us and how completely this love is revealed in Christ Jesus, our Lord – the only one that is worthy and safe to be called Lord.

This is the Paschal Mystery:  that by emptying ourselves, we may rise to new life.  Ronald Rolheiser in the Holy Longing says, “Like all things temporal, our understanding of God and the church too must constantly die and be raised to new life.  Our intentions may be sincere and noble, but so too were Mary Magdala’s on Easter morning when she tried to ignore the new reality of Jesus so as to cling to what had previously been, “ (p. 162).  What needs to be emptied in you to bring about new life?

In the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius, he talks a lot about this emptying as a way of detachment.  In making personal decisions, we should pray to get to the point where we could go either way in deciding (emptying ourselves).  That way, we are truly leaving it in God’s hands to make the decision, and thus doing God’s will.  He says, “One strives earnestly not to desire that money or anything else, except when one is motivated solely by the service of God our Lord; in such a way that the desire to be able to serve God our Lord better is what moves one to take or reject any object whatsoever,” (#155).

The Gospel – John 3: 13-17

God: all life begins with God; it is God who sent Jesus.

Loved the world: Here is the motive for all of God’s activity – God is love!

Gave his only Son: God gave in two senses – first, in the Incarnation  God’s Word, God’s Message became flesh in the world; second, this Son in whom God is perfectly present endured death, the ‘lifting up’ on the cross.

Believes: God asks us to respond to his love – believe in Jesus. This believing in John’s gospel is always an entering into a deep and abiding personal relationship with Jesus.

Not perish/eternal life: God’s plan is NOT for human destruction, condemnation, or punishment. God wishes us to trust his love so that this love can lead us to an eternal life where death is destroyed, wrong is righted, and peace/shalom is established forever. This is the Good News we exalt on today’s feast.

(“Working with the Word”, http://liturgy.slu.edu)

In Elizabeth Johnson’s Consider Jesus, she compares 2 theologians’ views on the cross.  Jurgen Moltmann, a German Reformed theologian, was a prisoner of war during WWII and wrote The Crucified God.  His view of salvation is that out of love, God freely chooses to be affected by what affects others, so that when people sin and suffer this influences the divine being.  He saw the cross as an event between God and God.  While Jesus suffers on the cross, both Father and Son are suffering, though in different ways.  Each suffers the loss of the other, yet they have never been so deeply united in one love.  In their common loving will to save the world, regardless of the cost, what is revealed is the Holy Spirit, who is the Love of the Father and Son.  At Jesus’ death his Spirit, God’s Love, is let loose on the world.  Only if all disaster is within God can God affect salvation.  (Think of all the current disasters today and how God may reveal Godself in them.)

Compare Moltmann with Edward Schillebeeckx, a Belgian Roman Catholic who is a Dominican and contributed greatly to Vatican II.  He says God wills life and not death, joy and not suffering, both for Jesus and for everyone else.  The cross reveals the tension between God and sinful humanity.  God, as pure positivity, enter into compassionate solidarity with Jesus on the cross, keeping faith with him, not abandoning him.  God is present in the mode of absence.  He keeps vigil until human freedom has played itself out and Jesus is destroyed.  Then God overcomes the evil of death through the act of resurrection, conquering and undoing the negativity wrought by human sinfulness.  We are saved not by the cross but despite it

Neither theologian is right or wrong…it is all just thinking aloud about knowing God.  Jesus is the Compassion of God.  Jesus is in solidarity with us, and we are all united with God in Jesus by being in compassionate solidarity with all those who suffer.

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One response

  1. Again, needed this. No theologian is “right” – we’re all working on the meaning of God playing out in ourselves, our loved ones, each with whom we cross paths in the world (and read of in the paper). It’s a lot. I love the idea of relaxing into that positivity. Thanks.

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