2nd Sunday in Ordinary Time, cycle B

1st Reading – Samuel 3: 3b — 10, 19

Samuel was the last of the judges and the first of the prophets –A time of transition . . .

This is a ‘classic’ story about discerning God’s call in our lives.  What steps do you see in this story about discernment?  Have you ever experienced God calling?  How have you experienced any “twists and turns’ in this calling?

Some people who have experienced the twists and turns of God’s calls:

Moses     Jeremiah     Mary     Paul     Francis of Assisi     Mother Teresa     Thomas Merton     Martin Luther King     all of us ?!

“Our lives have been shaped not just by one but by many calls from God, and God speaks not just with one voice but with many.” (Celebration, 2000)

From Mary Birmingham:

The Books of Samuel recall a time of transition. From the time of Joshua, Israel had been governed by a loose tribal confederacy. These books tell of the move to one central government that reached its pinnacle in the reigns of David and Solomon. The major figure during this time of political change was Samuel, a late-eleventh-century B.C. voice of the times. The books span the time from Samuel’s birth and childhood through the reign of David and his sons. David is remembered as Israel’s ‘golden age.’ Prior to David’s reign, Israel was suspicious of kings. These books reflect these suspicions. Many preferred the tribal system over the monarchy.  The Books of Samuel reflect these tensions. The first king, Saul (who Samuel anointed), was a great disappointment. David came and was able to unify the tribes and to establish the city of Jerusalem as the capital: it was on the border between the north and the south and, thus, acceptable to both. The high point of these books is Yahweh’s promise to David that his reign would last forever. Israel would remember this promise as a sign of God’s protection during future difficult times.   (Word and Worship Workbook for Year B, 451-451)

2nd Reading – I Corinthians 6: 13c-15a, 17-20:

Paul is speaking about what was common in Greek thinking at the time, that the body is separated from the soul.  Because of the separation, if one sinned, that was the body’s fault and not the soul.  So sin away!  Paul is telling them (and us!) that our souls are enfleshed.  We are body AND soul for the Lord.  How does this affect our lives today?  How do you use your whole self for God’s work?

From Exploring the Sunday Readings, Jan. 2000: Paul is trying to help us realize that we are people of Incarnation. Our God took on human flesh, and we encounter God not only – maybe not even primarily – in the hour of prayer, but in the many other hours of encounter with one another. Where we gather, Jesus is. If God is revealed to us in flesh and blood, then what happens to us in the flesh is not insignificant. Our sexuality, our stewardship of our health, our respect and care for life – especially for those who are weak, ill or voiceless – all of this has great importance.

The Gospel – John 1:35 – 42

Last Sunday’s gospel was about Jesus’ baptism: Jesus hearing God’s call.  Now Jesus begins to call others –to gather others – what can we learn from all this?

The title, Lamb of God, has many overtones and shades of meaning. It obviously was an important title for Jesus for John’s community. It contains a rather compact wealth of Christological information. Ray Brown and William Barclay point out the various meanings and images connected with this phrase.

  • Passover Lamb: By whose blood the Israelite slaves were saved from death (Exodus 12). This was also celebrated by the sacrifice of a lamb every morning and evening in the Temple in Jerusalem.
  • Suffering Servant Lamb: In whose suffering others would find healing and strength (Isaiah 53:7).
  • Triumphant Lamb: Whose mission it was to overcome evil and reign over all peoples of the earth (Revelation 7:17, plus it is used 29 times throughout the book).

As Barclay says, this title sums up “the love, the sacrifice, the suffering, and the triumph of Christ.”(Celebration, 2000, and The Gospel of John, Vol. 1, by William Barclay, p. 80-82)

From Mary Birmingham, Word and Worship for Year B, p. 457:

The readings for this Sunday remind us that “all of salvation history can be summarized as the process in which God is in constant search of human beings.  God is the initiator.  But the invitation must be accepted in faith and in freedom.  It is an invitation to respond.  We are told what that response involves: action.  Today’s gospel is pregnant with action words – see, stay, hear, believe, come, watch.  These verbs evoke the acts, which lead from one’s initial discovery of the Lord to the resolute commitment to follow him in order to be near him . . .

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One response

  1. Love this! “Today’s gospel is pregnant with action words – see, stay, hear, believe, come, watch.” Seems simple….. but not always EASY to stay ….. through the watching and hearing and coming back..

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