7th Sunday of Easter, Cycle A

This in-between-time is a time for a “significant pause” – a pause that refreshes!

The Spirit is always a gift freely given, but also ‘waited upon’ – constantly sought anew in prayer. This Spirit is the powerful, tangible presence of the Risen Christ who strengthens us to work for the good of all. The Spirit is not given to answer our every manipulative request. The Spirit is the gratuitous, unmerited gift of God’s love and action in our lives. In order to welcome this Spirit and be ready to respond, we are called to prayer and to self-sacrificing discipleship. (M Birmingham, W& W Workbook for Year A, p. 330)

1st Reading: Acts 1: 12-14

Jesus was “taken up to heaven”. . . What is ‘heaven’ to you?

The eleven, so important to Luke’s gospel, are named, as is Mary the mother of Jesus.  This is an indication of the parallel between the Spirit’s overshadowing of Mary at the conception of Jesus, and the Spirit’s overshadowing her and the other disciples at the birth of the Church.  There is great significance in the coming together of Jesus’ followers, not only as individuals but also as one body.  (Foundations in Faith, p. 101)  What experiences of gathering together with family and friends during times of confusion or anticipation have you had?  Why was it important to be together…what was the result of your coming together?

Prayer is a part of all of our readings today.  Since the twelve play such a key role as witnesses to Jesus’ ministry and the subsequent gospel proclamation, Luke sees it as essential that they be at full complement before the coming of the Spirit.  Mary, Jesus’ mother is the living personification of faith, the “brothers” of Jesus and the women (who were probably at the crucifixion) are all gathered together to pray (R. Faley, Footprints on the Mountain, p. 357).  Margaret Guenther says, “…there is no such thing as a private Christian spirituality.  Christian spirituality is a family affair:  it is lived in the midst of relationships with God and those around us,” (The Practice of Prayer, p. 10).  What does prayer do for you?

2nd Reading: 1 Peter 4: 13-16

In Kittel’s Theological Dictionary, it states: Greek, doxa (glory) Hebrew, kabod, have these connotations:  honor, splendor, divine radiance, something of great importance, that which reveals God’s very nature. It is God’s self-manifestation; it is what shows forth God’s impressiveness, importance, splendor!  How is this connected to the “sufferings of Christ” and our sufferings?  This reading is a warning about coming hardship and trials. As Christ was triumphant in the face of the horror of the cross, so we must trust that any of our trials and sufferings are transitory and are as nothing compared to the goodness and glory of God’s love for us. Any ‘dying’ that we must do is to be seen as an opportunity to share more fully in the paschal mystery of eternal life – a gift we have now and for ever more. (Living Liturgy, Year A, 2004 & M. Birmingham, Word and Worship Wbk. For Yr. A, p. 329)

Rob Bell, in his podcast series on Alternative Wisdom:

  1. Pre-conventional Wisdom:  unaware that there’s a way things are usually done, against the rules
  2. Conventional Wisdom:  the rules, how things are done
  3. Post-conventional Wisdom:  mindful bending or application of the rules, resisting or moving beyond rules because of reasons

You have to learn conventional wisdom before you can get to post-conventional.  It’s the wisdom after wisdom.  This is what Peter is talking about.  Jesus showed us that he suffered because of evil in the world.  If we want to be like Jesus, then we might have to as well.  But it is all for good.  Knowing that can bring us peace and glorifies God.  It is a deep knowing that abides with us now.  It is the other side of knowing…does that make sense?  How can you incorporate that in your life?

The Gospel: John 17: 1-11

What does it mean that Jesus “revealed God’s name”?  Kittel states: “It is a common belief of antiquity that the name is not just a label, but part of the personality of the one who bears it . . .the name carries will and power. The “name conjures up the person” carrying a real sense of presence and power. (Theological Dictionary of the New Testament, Abridged, 694)

Another time to ponder Ronald Rolheiser’s discussion of the Paschal Mystery in The Holy Longing, chapter 7:

The Paschal Mystery is a cycle for rebirth; this is what Jesus taught and lived.

There are two kinds of death:

Terminal death — a death that ends life and ends possibilities.

Paschal death – a death that while ending one kind of life, opens the person undergoing it to receive a deeper and richer form of life.

There are two kinds of life:

Resuscitated life – when one is restored to a former life and health.

Resurrected life – this is an entirely new way of life. Jesus did not get his old life back. He                             received a new life – a richer life and one within which he would not have                        to die again.

Jesus gives us a pattern in which with his help we, too, can experience this Paschal Mystery – throughout our lives – in many little deaths and risings – until someday we enter into the ultimate experience of this mystery – which is really God’s love for us – calling us always to fully experience his eternal love and life.

  1. Good Friday . . . “the loss of life – real death”
  2. Easter Sunday . . . “the reception of new life”
  3. The Forty Days . . . “a time for readjustment to the new and for grieving the old”
  4. Ascension . . . “letting go of the old and letting it bless you, the refusal to cling”
  5. Pentecost . . .”the reception of new spirit for the new life that one is already living”

In more common language of our day this means:

  1. “Name your deaths”
  2. “Claim your births”
  3. “Grieve what you have lost and adjust to the new reality”
  4. “Do not cling to the old, let it ascend and give you its blessing”
  5. “Accept the spirit of the life that you are in fact living”
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: