Commentary on 28th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Cycle C

1st Reading —  2 Kings 5: 14-17

Some talking points to this story:

  • It is a small Jewish girl that suggests to Naaman (head general) to go see Elisha. She is a slave from a country they have raided.  This is a story, like so many others in the Bible, of the underdog.
  • The king of Aram wrote to the king of Israel that he was sending Naaman, who laughed and thought it was a trick. When Elisha overheard, he intervened and said to send him to me.
  • When Naaman first arrives to see Elisha, Elisha doesn’t even come outside to greet him. Naaman at first gets angry and turns to leave, but the servants (again) convince him to stay and give Elisha’s suggestion of dousing in the river a try.
  • In this time period, there were localized deities. Each tribe had land and they had a god.  So if you were traveling or at war, you had to think about how that god would react.  The idea of the Jewish people that we all come from 1 God, that we are all brothers and sisters and we could actually live in peace was BIG.
  • Notice in the last line that Naaman now refers to himself as servant. All power is temporary.  Why does he want Israel’s dirt?  Because Israel dirt = Yahweh dirt and that is what he wants to worship on.  Naaman is enlightened by being healed, but he is still using his old, familiar categories (Don’t we all do this?).

Continue reading the next 2 lines of this passage (2 Kings 5:18-19)  Elisha is concerned about what’s going to happen when he returns home and has to worship his tribal god again, Rimmon.  Rather than admonish him, Elisha tells him to go in peace.  God is with us in the complexity of life.  To reflect on this further, listen to Rob Bell’s Podcast #34:

http://robbell.podbean.com/e/episode-34-enough-earth-for-my-mule/?token=0d737ef271d3d8973ab856a97fd069fe

2nd Reading —  2 Timothy 2: 8 –13

This letter in the name of Paul assures us that though he was ‘chained’ and eventually killed, “the Word of God is not chained” and that the God we find in Jesus Christ will be forever faithful – even when we are not.  God continues to work and inspire even our stage of reading and interpreting – helping these words live for us – enfleshing His love and presence in us.

“The Bible is not a book to be read,

but a drama in which to participate.” Abraham Heschel

How can the word of God free you?  William Barclay says, “Jesus must always be our own personal discovery.  Our religion can never be a carried tale.  Christianity does not mean reciting a creed; it means knowing a person,” (The Gospel of Luke, p. 121).

Margaret Silf says, “God’s life and grace will flow so much more fully and freely through empty hands, “(Inner Compass, p. 110).  How do we DO that?  Perhaps the leper teaches us…

The Gospel – Luke 17: 11-19

The leper was healed while ‘Jesus continued his journey to Jerusalem.” This is what happens to us when we walk with Jesus even to and through the difficult times and places of our lives.  We are healed each time we come to Eucharist praising God and becoming more perfectly a part of Christ’s body. We are healed each time we put others ahead of ourselves. We are healed each time we choose to forgive those who wrong us, even as we try to overcome the evil.  We are healed each time we pause a few seconds to ‘give thanks to God’ for the many blessings of each day. Such gratitude makes our faith a vibrant and growing reality: we owe all to God who gives us everything that is good.  Faithfulness and thankfulness go (grow?) together (Living Liturgy, Cycle C, p.224-227).

Jesus as healer was constantly challenging existing boundaries and pushing them ever outward.  Sinners, the blind, the lame and lepers were welcome within the boundaries of the holy community Jesus was forming.  Now that the lepers were healed, they are restored to their communities. The nine that left may have gone to the priests to thank God there.  The Samaritan leper could not enter Jerusalem, so he couldn’t do that.  He recognized Jesus as being one with God, and so he thanked him personally.  The other nine lepers may actually bump into Jesus again…do you think they might thank him later?  The Samaritan grabbed his opportunity while he had it, (Pilch, The Cultural World of Jesus, Cycle C, p. 150).  What opportunities do you have to thank God?

From A. Gittins’ Encountering Jesus:  Poor people and sick people are often overlooked or forever pushed around, sent here and there with vague promises of redress or assistance.  Theirs is a never-ending round of deferrals and dead-ends.  They become used to excuses or prevarication from bureaucrats or people without compassion.  We have to wonder what these ten lepers must have felt when Jesus appeared to dismiss them and send them on their way without really having encountered them.  Did they set off with a spring in their step, or simply accept another rebuff, and go their way with no intention of heading for the priests?  We cannot know, but we can imagine (p. 66)…According to Luke’s story, all 10 lepers were cured of their condition.  And, only one was also truly healed:  restored to a full relationship with God through both divine initiative and human response (p. 67).

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