6th Sunday of Easter, Cycle C

1st Reading – The Acts of the Apostles 15: 1-2, 22-29

Compare this with Galatians 2: 1-15.  This is Paul’s account of what happened. Remember, Paul is writing about what he himself had experienced, while Luke is writing later about things that happened to others.  

  1. Why Paul attended the Council:  Luke (author of Acts) says he was sent by the community in Antioch, while Paul says he went on his own initiative.
  2. The Discussions at the Council:  Luke implies that the meeting was calm and serene with Peter and James making the decision, while Paul makes the discussions sound more lively and that there was a common agreement.
  3. The Decision:  In Luke, a selection was made from elements of dietary, ritual, and marital law, and this selection was to be imposed on the Gentile congregations.  Paul is very clear that the Gospel is the good news, freely given, and that we are saved without the works of the Law. 

In the end, it was Paul’s view that prevailed.  But at this time of the early church, perhaps it was necessary to have these few rules for Jewish/Gentile Christians  to feel united, (Dwyer, John, Church History, p. 40-43).  What can we learn about the early church in all this?  What do you see of how the Lord’s Spirit works?

2nd Reading – Revelation 21: 10- 14, 22- 23

By the time this was written, Jerusalem and its temple had been destroyed by Rome.   The mention of the twelve tribes suggests that the city represents the gathering of a people, like church.  But there is no temple in this vision…meaning God and God alone who continues the relationship with his people face to face.  God dwells WITH us!  How does this vision speak of the fullness of God’s presence for you?

From William Barclay, The Revelation of John, p. 212:

Consider the dimensions of the heavenly Jerusalem – each side was 1,500 miles long and the total area of the city was 2,250,000 square miles (These verses were omitted.)! A city with that area would stretch from London to New York. Surely we are meant to see that in the holy city there is room for everyone. Then when we come to the wall it is only 266 feet high – not very high by ancient standards (the walls of Babylon were 300 feet high). Certainly, there is no comparison between the walls and the size of this city—here again is symbolism. It is not meant to keep people out – it is perhaps simply a delineation. God is much more eager to bring people in – to let them know they are safe within his peace – than to shut them out . . .

How is God like a light for us?

The Gospel: John 14: 23- 29

The Spirit that filled Jesus of Nazareth throughout his life, death, and resurrection is the same Spirit that is now available to us as a free gift.  Jesus made this Spirit an historical reality for us.  What means the most to you in this reading?  How do you find Jesus’ Word and love and peace connected?

The word, “Advocate,” is sometimes translated “paraclete,” “counselor” or “comforter” – the Greek word used basically means a legal term that is for the “one who stands by the side of a defendant.” From its use in the gospel it seems that it has three functions or activities.

1) It is the continued presence of Jesus on earth after his life/death/resurrection/ascension experience.

2) It is a truth-telling Spirit (14:17; 16:13) assuring us that Jesus is not a shameful failure, but the beloved of God.

3) It reminds them of things that Jesus said (14:26) and reveals things Jesus was unable to convey (16: 12-14).

In other words, this Advocate represents divine presence and guidance.  It is all we need!

There were 2 things happening in the Johannine church that contributed to the understanding of the Paraclete.  Jesus’ return was not as imminent as was once believed.  This caused confusion.  Eyewitnesses to the Jesus event were no longer alove, thus making human authentication next to impossible.  The Paraclete answered both problems.  The Paraclete was the real presence of the risen Christ in the midst of the community.  The community was experiencing realized eschatology. They were living in the reign of God in this realm as they awaited the next.  Through the Paraclete, God’s people would continue to encounter the presence of Christ, (M. Birmingham’s Word and Worship, p. 301).  So are we!

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