Tag Archives: 2 Chronicles

4th Sunday of Lent, Cycle B

1st Reading – 2 Chronicles 36: 14 – 23

Along with Ezra and Nehemiah, 1 and 2 Chronicles represent a type of ‘history’ of the people of Israel from their origins to the period of reconstruction AFTER the exile.  The world had changed.  The author exalts David even more than he is exalted in Kings 1 & 2; the exile was viewed more as the people’s failure to worship Yahweh.  But in today’s reading, we hear God hating the sin but loves the sinner.  God is always ready to forgive at the first sign of a repentant heart, (M. Birmingham’s W&W Wkbk for Yr B, p. 214).

“Real forgiveness means looking steadily at the sin, the sin that is left over without any excuse, after all allowances have been made, and seeing it in all its horror, dirt, meanness and malice, and nevertheless being wholly reconciled to the person who has done it.  That, and only that, is forgiveness,”  (J.C. Arnold’s Why Forgive?, p. 44).

2nd Reading – Ephesians 2: 4-10

The theology in this letter is in sharp contrast to the retributive-type justice we see in the first reading.  How does this writer see God working in human history?

To many Greeks philosophical systems and self-improvement ideas were seen as ways to great human capabilities. To them the ‘saving act’ was knowledge.  The Christian writer who composed this letter is trying to emphasize that ‘salvation’ is God’s transforming gift to sinners.  The writer was trying to stress that God’s great love (revealed and given freely to us in Jesus) is not a reward for good works or great knowledge. Yet, a life of good deeds is the natural outcome,  (Celebration, March 2003).

God is personal.  God is not a by-itself, or an in-itself, or an in-and-of itself, but rather God exists in a communion of persons toward one another in self-giving Love, revealed in Word and Spirit in human life, in history, in the world.  God is immutably toward us and for us in the self-giving Love that is constitutive of the divine life.  All reality is personal.  Everything that exists is from God, in God, for God, who is God precisely in the relations of interpersonal self-giving Love:  Father, Son, Spirit, (M. Downey’s Altogether Gift, p. 62).

The Gospel – John 3: 14-21

John’s Gospel is one of darkness and light; this contrast is used throughout it.  Nicodemus comes to Jesus at night (verse 2) looking for new life.  We later find Nicodemus along with Joseph of Arimathea after the crucifixion anointing Jesus’ body with over a hundred pounds of myrrh and aloes. (John 19: 38-42)

In the Book of Numbers the Israelites while wandering in the desert complained about being hungry, thirsty, — then when serpents began to bite them, they were sure that God was punishing them.  Moses prayed to God and God told Moses to make a fiery serpent out of bronze and put it on a pole.  Anyone bitten by a snake could look upon the bronze serpent and be saved from death. In this gospel, Jesus compared himself to this serpent — the one lifted up who can save us from death.  (Sunday by Sunday, March 2003)

The contradiction in the paschal mystery is that what we abhor — the cross — becomes the instrument of redemption.  God saves Israelites from death. Yet, in the paschal mystery of Jesus Christ we must embrace death for the only way to eternal life is by dying to ourselves. In this ‘dying’ we can then allow ourselves to be lifted up like Christ.  Our good works — reaching out to others, working to improve the world around us, caring and acting kindly and justly– all of this is ‘being lifted up’ — being crucified so we might live. We sometimes choose to do difficult things – not because the suffering is good but because the end is good.     (Living Liturgy, 2003)

Light and believing is important in this gospel.  The light = Christ who enables us to see; seeing is believing — it is also activity. John’s gospel uses the verb believe 98 times — never is the noun used.  Both believing and not believing is expressed in actions.  Those who do not believe hate the light and do ‘wicked things’ and their ‘works are evil.’ To come into the light exposes evil deeds.  The one who lives the truth is the one who does the truth.  A Christian must live the choice for Jesus with one’s whole life.          (Living Liturgy, 2003)

Sometimes wouldn’t we really rather be able to ‘save ourselves’? Wouldn’t we like to point to our successes, our virtues, our improvements, our earnestness  — all our efforts and deeds? But salvation is not our doing and at least on ‘bad days’ we are grateful for that. Maybe like Nicodemus we come to Jesus in the dark and only when we trust God’s rich mercy and abundant grace can we finally come to not fear the light. We do not so much achieve our salvation as we entrust ourselves to it –  by God’s love and favor we are saved. (John Kavanaugh, S.J., “The Word Encountered,” http://liturgy.slu.edu )

In the end our faith must help us ‘deal with’ the suffering in life. It is the ‘test’ of every religion to try to answer this question: “what are we to do with our pain? In and with Jesus we can face the reality of pain, suffering, rejection – even death – and then let this reality transform us. This is the ‘Paschal Mystery’ of Jesus – the dying and rising that is a part of our lives. If we do not transform pain, we will transmit it. (from Richard Rohr)

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