Tag Archives: 2 Kings

28th Sunday in Ordinary Time, cycle C

1st Reading —  2 Kings 5: 14-17

Some talking points to this story:

  • It is a small Jewish girl that suggest to Naaman (head general) to go see Elisha. She is a slave from a country they have raided.  This is a story, like so many others in the Bible, of the underdog.
  • The king of Aram wrote to the king of Israel that he was sending Naaman, who laughed and thought it was a trick. When Elisha overheard, he intervened and said to send him to me.
  • When Naaman first arrives to see Elisha, Elisha doesn’t even come outside to greet him. Naaman at first gets angry and turns to leave, but the servants (again) convince him to stay and give Elisha’s suggestion of dousing in the river a try.
  • In this time period, there were localized deities. Each tribe had land and they had a god.  So if you were traveling or at war, you had to think about how that god would react.  The idea of the Jewish people that we all come from 1 God, that we are all brothers and sisters and we could actually live in peace was BIG.
  • Notice in the last line that Naaman now refers to himself as servant. All power is temporary.  Why does he want Israel’s dirt?  Because Israel dirt = Yahweh dirt and that is what he wants to worship on.  Naaman is enlightened by being healed, but he is still using his old, familiar categories (Don’t we all do this?).

Continue reading the next 2 lines of this passage (2 Kings 5:18-19)  Elisha is concerned about what’s going to happen when he returns home and has to worship his tribal god again, Rimmon.  Rather than admonish him, Elisha tells him to go in peace.  God is with us in the complexity of life.  To reflect on this further, listen to Rob Bell’s Podcast #34:

http://robbell.podbean.com/e/episode-34-enough-earth-for-my-mule/?token=0d737ef271d3d8973ab856a97fd069fe

2nd Reading —  2 Timothy 2: 8 –13

This letter in the name of Paul assures us that though he was ‘chained’ and eventually killed, “the Word of God is not chained” and that the God we find in Jesus Christ will be forever faithful – even when we are not.  God continues to work and inspire even our stage of reading and interpreting – helping these words live for us – enfleshing His love and presence in us.

“The Bible is not a book to be read,

but a drama in which to participate.” Abraham Heschel

How can the word of God free you?  William Barclay says, “Jesus must always be our own personal discovery.  Our religion can never be a carried tale.  Christianity does not mean reciting a creed; it means knowing a person,” (The Gospel of Luke, p. 121).

Margaret Silf says, “God’s life and grace will flow so much more fully and freely through empty hands, “(Inner Compass, p. 110).  How do we DO that?  Perhaps the leper teaches us…

The Gospel – Luke 17: 11-19

The leper was healed while ‘Jesus continued his journey to Jerusalem.” This is what happens to us when we walk with Jesus even to and through the difficult times and places of our lives.  We are healed each time we come to Eucharist praising God and becoming more perfectly a part of Christ’s body. We are healed each time we put others ahead of ourselves. We are healed each time we choose to forgive those who wrong us even as we try to overcome the evil.  We are healed each time we pause a few seconds to ‘give thanks to God’ for the many blessings of each day. Such gratitude makes our faith a vibrant and growing reality: we owe all to God who gives us everything that is good.  Faithfulness and thankfulness go (grow?) together (Living Liturgy, Cycle C, p.224-227).

The ten lepers asked Jesus to have pity on them.  Pity, or mercy, in the Mediterranean world, means to motivate someone to meet his or her interpersonal obligation.  In effect, the ten people in Luke are asking Jesus to give them what he owes them!

 

Jesus as healer was constantly challenging existing boundaries and pushing them ever outward.  Sinners, the blind, the lame and lepers were welcome within the boundaries of the holy community Jesus was forming.  Now that the lepers were healed, they are restored to their communities. The nine that left may have gone to the priests to thank God there.  The Samaritan leper could not enter Jerusalem, so he couldn’t do that.  He recognized Jesus as being one with God, and so he thanked him personally.  The other nine lepers may actually bump into Jesus again…do you think they might thank him later?  The Samaritan grabbed his opportunity while he had it, (Pilch, The Cultural World of Jesus, Cycle C, p. 150).  What opportunities do you have to thank God?    

For further reflection on being grateful now, consider Rabbi Kenneth R. Berger’s 1986 sermon on “Five Minutes to Live” which can be found at:

https://rabbiedbernstein.files.wordpress.com/2016/10/five-minutes-to-live-rabbi-kenneth-berger-z22l-yom-kippur-sermon-sept-1986.pdf

He talks about the discovery that the astronauts had five minutes in the Challenger before their death and wondered what they thought about.  Here’s an exerpt:

You are here: I know for some its aches and pains, physical and emotional, but you are here. Be grateful for that. I don’t mean to be so blunt, but you are not in a grave, you are not in intensive care, you are not bed-ridden, you are in Shul welcoming in another New Year, and that sounds okay to me, and it should to you.

 

In short, say to yourself, Boy, I am blessed, with being alive, with having family and friends, with the ability to be in Shul welcoming in a New Year.

 

In only I appreciated what I had when I had it. . . . .appreciate it now. . . . my friends, when you have it.

 

Yes, If only I had known. . . . If only I had realized and appreciated what I had: and as the shuttle falls through the sky, the third possibility: “If only I had other chance, I would do things differently.”

17th Sunday in Ordinary Time, cycle B

Let us pray in the spirit of the Letter of St. Paul to the Ephesians (4:1-6):

Brothers and sisters,

St. Paul urges us to live in a manner worthy of the call

we have received,

with all humility and gentleness, with patience,

bearing with one another through love,

striving to preserve the unity of the spirit

through the bond of peace:

one body and one Spirit,

as we were also called to the one hope of our call;

one Lord, one faith, one baptism;

one God and Father of all,

who is over all and through all and in all.  AMEN

This is the translation in The Message:  “In light of all this, here’s what I want you to do. While I’m locked up here, a prisoner for the Master, I want you to get out there and walk—better yet, run!—on the road God called you to travel. I don’t want any of you sitting around on your hands. I don’t want anyone strolling off, down some path that goes nowhere. And mark that you do this with humility and discipline—not in fits and starts, but steadily, pouring yourselves out for each other in acts of love, alert at noticing differences and quick at mending fences.  You were all called to travel on the same road and in the same direction, so stay together, both outwardly and inwardly. You have one Master, one faith, one baptism, one God and Father of all, who rules over all, works through all, and is present in all. Everything you are and think and do is permeated with Oneness.”  How does this speak to you?

1st Reading: 2 Kings 4: 42-44

From Mary Birmingham, Word and Worship for Year B, 583-584:

The faith history of Israel between King David’s death and the Babylonian exile (586 B.C.) is encapsulated in the Books of Kings. These books relate the history of a people in relationship with their God. It gives a rather panoramic view of the Davidic dynasty, the relationship between the Northern Kingdom (Israel) and the Southern Kingdom (Judea), and the religious judgments of a people. During this time the prophetic tradition also developed. The kings and leaders and the people were not only to worship Yahweh, but they were to live according to the wisdom and love of Yahweh. Elijah and Elisha were early, legendary prophets and holy men. Many of the remembered stories of them are a bit like epic cinema. None of the other prophets spoke of miracles, but the powerful ministries of these two men are replete with such stories.

Barley loaves were used in the Temple offering. The man who brought the bread to Elisha as “first fruit” also has a liturgical significance. By rights the man should have taken the ritual bread to the Gilgal sanctuary, which had been turned into a shrine to the pagan god, Baal. He chose, instead, to take the bread to Elisha as a sign that he would not worship idols but would remain true to the one Lord and God.  First fruits are sacred, something very meaningful and precious to offer to the Lord.  What are your first fruits?  Are you willing to lift them up to the Lord?

The Gospel: John 6: 1-15

What does this story reveal to you about God?  Notice the setting: It is by the shore of the Sea of Galilee. 5,000 people were there (quite different from the wedding feast of Cana, the first sign in John’s gospel). Jesus is up on a mountain, like Moses – and like Moses he is called to care for a great, hungry multitude. Twelve wicker baskets…like the 12 tribes of Israel, the 12 apostles, all the people—a number of completeness.  Barley is the type of bread used, the bread of the poor – it also was used in Temple worship. Barley is a hearty grain. It can survive extreme weather conditions such as heat and drought. It matures in less time than other grains. The feast of Passover coincides with the barley feast, so it no surprise that barley cakes take a star role in this drama. Galilee was famous for its pickled fish; dried fish was also common – an easy ‘luncheon meat’ to bring along for a journey. The word fish in Greek (ichtys) was also an acronym for Jesus Christ Savior, Son of God, and a symbol used in the early church to identify Christians.

Consider how limited the disciples seem in their problem solving.  Philip can’t seem to figure out how to feed the crowd.  Their limitations are like the church’s limitations.  There aren’t enough priests…how will the people receive Eucharist?  But Andrew and the little boy are more imaginative.  How do we overcome our limitations?

Also consider what happens with the crowd when they have to share.  Jesus created a sense of community when 5 thousand people (probably more since as the scripture says, it only included men) gathered.  There is common ground in everyone sharing the same food…one body, one Spirit  (in Ephesians).  Sunday by Sunday by Shawn Madigan, CSJ