Tag Archives: Deuteronomy

1st Sunday of Lent, cycle C

Consider how these reading occur in the desert…the quiet, the barren, the emptiness…

1st Reading: Deuteronomy 26: 4-10

One of the greatest gifts the people of Israel have given the world is their assurance that God’s love is active in our lives – even in the negative times – even in our limitations.  How is this reading reminding us of this truth? 

From W&W, Birmingham, 125:

This was part of a liturgy of thanksgiving.  The people offered their prayers and thanks for the first fruits of the harvest.  How might this reading remind you of Eucharist?  First fruits were considered sacred.  Before moving forward in God’s grace, we must first pause to offer up what we have and give thanks.

The exodus proved that God was in relationship with a people.  The desert and God’s plan for Israel were intimately bound together.  Connected with this is the oldest ‘credo’ of ancient Israel.  It is a profession of faith rooted in the saving acts of Yahweh, their God.

  1. Yahweh established the southern kingdom of Judah.
  2. The Lord God delivered Israel out of bondage, forming a people in the desert.
  3. Yahweh gave them possession of the promised land.

2nd Reading: Romans 10: 8-13

Faith needs to be both deep within our hearts AND spoken out loud by our lips.  What did this mean to these early Christians?

To be ‘justified’ means to be in right relationship with God. To trust that our God claims us as his own. This free gift of God’s acceptance is just that – free, un-won, unmerited. In Jesus we find a God who assures us that his justice is filled with love. It is in responding to this love and acceptance – faith – that we find true life and power – a power that can live even beyond our own handicaps and deaths. (John C. Dwyer, The Lost Gospel of Paul, 43+)

Paul’s message is clear:  in order to become transformed, all one needed to do was embrace the message of Jesus Christ.  The Holy Spirit, then would slowly begin the process of transformation.  Jesus proves this in the Gospel reading!  (W&W, Birmingham, 126)

Paul insisted that Jesus died once and for all people.  It was a complete act of gratuitous, unmerited, unconditional love.  The response to such love can be nothing less than the complete offering of one’s entire life to the God who loves so greatly.  Human beings are justified by faith, not by observance of the law or by their own merits.  It was a difficult message to accept.  Justification through the law was ingrained in the people’s consciousness and history.

This is seen in Vatican II!  “Following the desire and command of Christ, the Church makes a serious effort to present the Gospel to the whole world so that people can share in God’s love.  Everyone who is baptized is charged with this mission.  The Church works and prays diligently with great hope that everyone in the whole world will ultimately join together as the People of God, “  (Vat II in Plain English: The Constitutions, p. 38).

The Gospel: Luke 4:1-13:

Jesus said that “One does not live by bread alone.”  For what do you hunger? How do these things nourish you?

The Greek word for ‘to tempt’ – periazein – means to test more than it means to entice someone to do wrong. How is this meaning important here?  In Jesus’ day, devils were ‘seen’ everywhere. Today, we might understand evil and sickness differently. How can this story of wilderness and devils speak to us today?

Jesus left the desert convinced of three things:

  1. His power is for love; it is not to be used for self-satisfaction.
  2. He is called to serve, not to be served.
  3. He will not bargain with evil, even if it means suffering.

(From Mark Link, S.J. “We Believe in Revelation: Preministry of Jesus,”, 1989, Tabor Publishing)

From Living Liturgy, 2004:

During Lent we can remember that in a desert we are in a place of isolation and desolation where we need like Jesus to be filled with God’s Holy Spirit – we cannot rely on our own means to overcome the problems we face in a desert. Like Jesus, we can find God’s Word to be a source of wisdom and strength. Because of this, Lent can also be a springtime of renewed relationship with God – a time to allow ourselves to be warmed and strengthened by God’s Spirit.

In our desert of ‘daily demands’ and pressures we will find new ways to open ourselves to God’s power which will help us to ‘take up the cross’ of daily living as we attempt through acts of kindness, justice, and encouragement to ‘lay down our lives for others.’

Here is a great truth: what we call temptation is not meant to make us sin; it is meant to help us conquer sin. It is not meant to make us bad, but good – not to weaken, but to strengthen, to refine and to purify. Jesus’ time of testing took place in the wilderness, an area between Jerusalem and the Dead Sea called the Devastation. It stretched over 35 miles by 15 miles – a place of yellow sand, of crumbling limestone, of scattered shingle. Contorted strata, warped and twisted ridges, jagged and bare rock ran in all directions. It glowed with daytime sun and heat; it chilled at night with darkness and cold. It was a place of ‘aloneness’ and danger: a testing place. And Jesus was tested right after his baptism – right after the powerful joy of hearing, “You are my Beloved.” His call to react to all of this was the Spirit driving him into this desert. It seems to be sort of a law of life that just as we come to a high point in our lives we can then nose-dive into danger. Also – we should remember that we are often tempted – tested – through our gifts. If we have charm, a gift for words, a vivid imagination – these talents can also lead us to problems: false pride, sensations, lies and excuses. Jesus, too, was tempted to use his powers for ‘showing-off’ in stead of showing forth God – for compromising with evil rather than trusting in his Father’s love. Jesus was tested as we are. Jesus was strengthened to turn away from the path of sensation, self-gratification, and compromise.  As he will ultimately do on the cross at the end of his life, Jesus puts his life into the hands of his Father. (Wm. Barclay, The Daily Study Bible Series: the Gospel of Matthew, vol.1, p. 62-70)

The Spirit prompted Jesus and provided the scriptures that Jesus needed to combat his enemy.  The word is the weapon but the Spirit engages in the battle  (W&W, Birmingham, 130).  How might scripture be a weapon and the Spirit do battle in your life?

The Most Holy Trinity, cycle B

trinity

Thoughts from Exploring the Sunday Readings, June 2005:

Understanding the Trinity by some feat of mathematics may be out of the question, but it is within our grasp to apprehend the Holy Presence through the power of the indwelling Spirit. To know God, start by making yourself known to God [opening yourself to God in prayer]. The Creator of the universe may seem too awesome for us. The Holy Spirit, as intimate as our next breath, may yet seem too mystical. But Jesus is the one in whom this God is completely present, and still we have been invited to call him friend. He is the one who knows us as one of us: He knew birthdays, hard work, good company, simple meals, and great feasts. He knew irritation, weariness, friendship, family, rejection, and suffering. Jesus is the one who can lead us through all that life has to offer us: there is no place we can go that he has not been.

1st Reading: Deuteronomy 4:32-34, 39-40

From Celebration, June 11, 2006:

Deuteronomy means ‘a second law’ – it is written as if Moses is giving a farewell address to his people before they cross the Jordan river and enter Canaan. It is comprised of both early and late material, some perhaps as early as the 10th century B.C. and some as late as the 7th century B.C. It speaks of a God who not only created all things, but who wishes to also be involved with and care for all that he has brought forth.

How does this reading speak to you about our God?  Do you feel this greatness of God in your life?  Is it fixed in your heart?

2nd Reading: Romans 8: 14-17

Paul here is using Roman law and customs to explain how God wishes to relate to us. According to Roman law, the father’s power over the family was absolute. A son never came of age; he was always under the control of his father. To adopt a son was a major undertaking. It followed a long and exact ritual. But once done, the adopted person belongs forever to the new father. Here are some of the consequences of these legal adoptions:

  • The adoptee gave up all rights in his former family and gained all rights and dignity of a legitimate child in his new family.
  • The adoptee became the legal heir of his new father and even if others are born afterwards, his rights could not be affected.
  • The old life of the adoptee was wiped out and all debts were cancelled.
  • The adoptee was regarded as a new person and a true son/daughter.

(Celebration, June 11, 2006)

What do you find most important in this reading?  How does it feel to know you  are a child of God  (Family!) and able to ENTER INTO this trinity?

The Gospel: Matthew 28: 16-20

Matthew’s gospel began with the story of Jesus’ birth saying “and they shall name him Emmanuel, which means God is with us.” (1:23). Now with this ending passage, Matthew has Jesus again assuring the disciples who are sent out to all the world (no longer just to fellow Jews) saying: “And behold, I am with you always . . .”

What strikes you most about this gospel?  Isn’t it interesting that the moment the disciples doubted, that’s when Jesus sent them off with work to do?  None of us are completely prepared, but we are sent anyway.  Just as we are.

4th Sunday in Ordinary Time, cycle B

1st Reading: Deuteronomy 18: 15-20

This book is a ‘second law, a second look’ at the covenant between God and his people. It was written after the exile when Israel was rediscovering their roots. It is in the form of an address written as if Moses is giving a final speech to the people before they cross the Jordan into the promised land. It is also his farewell speech to his people. He had led them out of slavery and now through the desert. They will enter the Promised Land without him, but not without teaching and guidance from the Lord. This book contains long speeches and sermons that are intended to help the people reflect further on the law, God’s teaching on how they are to live. There is a constant call to reform and to live faithfully the covenant between God and God’s people.  For Christians, we are reminded that Jesus was and is the new Moses, the ultimate one in whose words God’s authority and power lived – and lives!  (Birmingham, W&W Workbook Yr B, 467-468)

We often picture Moses as Charlton Heston, someone confident and suave.  But he had to be talked into his role.  Remember he asked God to have his brother Aaron speak for him because he didn’t think his voice would carry?  Moses was one with his people, “from among your own kin”. He didn’t put himself above them.  Consider this relationship with Jesus too.  What does it mean for your life?  Is it easier to listen to someone who is one with you?  What about in your actions…do you place yourself at one with others if you are in a position of authority?

2nd Reading: 1 Corinthians 7: 32-35

In order to understand this passage, it is important to read this part in connection with the rest of the chapter and the letter.  Taken out of context, it is very easy to misunderstand Paul’s words and to misuse these words.  Paul did seem to have a bias in favor of celibacy — maybe because he himself was not married, or because he was a widow, or because he truly believed that the second coming was immanent. He was also reacting here within the culture of Corinth that seemed to hold two extremes: one of sexual promiscuity, and one of sexual asceticism. When you read the entire chapter (and letter) you can see these important ideas coming forth:

1) Paul believed that our bodies were holy and that there was virtue in praising God with our total selves. 2) Paul believed in the mutuality of men and women and that there was to be a balance of rights between husband and wife. 3) Lawful, married sexual relations in no way prohibited a person from coming to God in prayer. While celibacy might be seen as a ‘gift’ to some, it was not intended for everyone. 4) Paul held sacred the human dignity of every person – men and women. Both are equal. Both husband and wife are to ‘please’ their spouse. This suggests a view of marriage as a union of sensitive friendship and respect.  (Birmingham, W&W Wrkbk for Yr B, 468-469)  In light of all of this, what meaning do you get from this passage?

The Gospel: Mark 1: 21-28

From John Pilch, The Cultural World of Jesus, Cycle B:

We see much of the ‘culture’ of the times here in this passage;

spirits, both good and bad, were part of the belief system of Jesus’ time. It was believed that spirits also had much greater power than humans. Only God had more power. To call out the name of a spirit was to have power over it. So by shouting out Jesus’ true identity, the unclean spirit was trying to overcome Jesus’ power. Jesus was also ‘just an artisan from Nazareth.’ He was acting totally out of line with his inherited status – thus he astonished the people (Some translations say spellbound!). Yet, Jesus’ words are in line with his actions. So to those who could see this truth, he regained his honor and his “fame spread everywhere.” Even the man who had been filled with “an unclean spirit” was now released and reunited with his people.  Today, we no longer see illness as ‘demonic.’  We have other ‘demons’ for Jesus to overcome. (28-29)

From Eduard Schweizer, The Good News According to Mark:

We also see in Mark’s dramatic story how God is speaking through Jesus in such a way that those who have been separated are brought back into fellowship with God and each other. In Jesus’ word, heaven actually breaks in and hell is abolished. Jesus’ words are action and life. (48-52)

From Celebration, Jan. 2006:

The word, authority, which in Greek is exousia means ex “out of” and ousia which means “being.” So Jesus taught out of his very being . . .

What do you think Mark meant when he used this word to refer to Jesus and his way of teaching.

From William Barclay:

The word, demons, is mazzikin which means those who mean harm. They were believed to be terrifyingly numerous, and were seen as an evil force between God and humans. (The Gospel According to Mark, 34)

The word ‘manna’ can be translated to ‘What is this?, which is what the people said of Jesus. Who is this person of authority?  He will be their nourishment, if they choose to be open and listen to him.  Do we?  What happens to us when we do?

From NCR Jan 16-29, 2015:  Why were the people astonished because he spoke not as the scribes?  Unlike the scribes, who called upon Scripture or upon famed rabbis or knowledgeable scholars, Jesus possessed authority that was his own, by virtue of who he was.